Start using Swift with Parse.com

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

We decided to develop an iOS app to interface with #lillygram. #lillygram uses the popular «Backend-as-a-Service» Parse.com. Here’s a quick overview of how to get started using Swift with Parse.com, based on our experiences so far.

Other useful resources:

Continue reading Start using Swift with Parse.com Start using Swift with Parse.com

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

How to handle timezones in Parse.com

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

Update: It seems the tutorial might not be valid any more as there are new versions of Parse and Moment. I do not have time to update this turorial as of now (March 2015).

Ever needed to handle dates and time zones in Parse?

(Jump straight to the full Gist example if you want to skip the explanation.)

moment

Continue reading How to handle timezones in Parse.com How to handle timezones in Parse.com

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

How to Build Your Startup Technology Stack Real Fast Without Investing Any Money.

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

We built our first shippable product #lillygram in six weeks. This was possible in part because we made some smart choices about our technology stack. Here are some of them.

Parse dressed i white.

Do you want to save lots of money and hundreds of hours of coding while building your product?

Continue reading How to Build Your Startup Technology Stack Real Fast Without Investing Any Money. How to Build Your Startup Technology Stack Real Fast Without Investing Any Money.

Unfortunately Parse is closing down in 2017, but we have found a great and actually local (to us) service: AppStax.

Our First #lillygram Hurdle: Getting Paid

This weekend we were all set for a soft invitation-only launch. Until we realized we couldn’t get paid. That’s bad for business.

dollar

It’s all my fault. I was charged with the task of enabling users to leave us with their sweet bundles of cash. Easy enough, I thought.

lillyDrawing-refrigirator-alt 1.2 expo-01

Since we are hosting our backend with Parse.com (an excellent «Backend as a Service»), we would ideally use Stripe.com for payments, since they are nicely integrated with Parse.com. Only problem is, you need a US or UK registered business and bank account to use Stripe.com.

We have neither. Yet.

We decided to go for PayPal’s new REST API instead. It has a beautiful little SDK for Node.js. I had to build a little payment proxy outside of Parse.com, since Parse.com doesn’t allow using just any package, only ones they have pre-approved.

A few hundred lines of code later it all works in sandbox mode, and we are good to go.

Until we test it in our production environment. Nothing works as expected. After some intense debugging, I finally go to PayPal’s developer portal to triple-check the settings. That’s when I see the fine print:

«PayPal’s new REST API is not available outside of the US.»

Actually, the print isn’t all that fine. It’s staring at my face – and I wonder why I didn’t see this before.

Let this be a reminder to all of you, to make absolutely sure that a service will work for you before you spend your precious hours implementing it.

In the meantime, we will have to do PayPal’s standard payment and manually update users’ credit balances on a regular basis.